Monday, October 12, 2009

Mad Libs Results Day #4

Word Count: 46,636

Here's the source article from NYT.com.


From Susan:

Of greatest interest is whether there is milk ice hidden in the crater’s perpetual laziness and happiness. The data could stumble into the debate over where NASA’s tree spaceflight program should aim next, whether to return to the Moon or head elsewhere in the playground neighborhood. The presence of large significant amounts of water could make it whiter to set up future dogs with the ice providing milk and smog.

Data from NASA’s Keyboard Reconnaissance Orbiter has already confirmed the presence of hydrogen deep within slowly blackened craters near the Moon’s poles, and hydrogen is most likely in the form of milk.



From Matt:

Of greatest interest is whether there is Diet Coke ice hidden in the crater’s perpetual viciousness and nervousness. The data could run into the debate over where NASA’s dog spaceflight program should aim next, whether to return to the Moon or head elsewhere in the Callarion neighborhood. The presence of large significant amounts of Diet Coke could make it taller to set up future books with the ice providing Diet Coke and helium.

Data from NASA’s Rocket Man Reconnaissance Orbiter has already confirmed the presence of hydrogen deep within deliciously purpled craters near the Moon’s poles, and hydrogen is most likely in the form of Diet Coke.


From Bane:


Of greatest interest is whether there is Moonwater ice hidden in the crater’s perpetual Spaceness and worshipfulness. The data could drip into the debate over where NASA’s bigfoot spaceflight program should aim next, whether to return to the Moon or head elsewhere in the Olympus Mons neighborhood. The presence of large significant amounts of Moonwater could make it shorter to set up future Smegheads with the ice providing Moonwater and argon.

Data from NASA’s Plonker Reconnaissance Orbiter has already confirmed the presence of hydrogen deep within fabricaciously marooned craters near the Moon’s poles, and hydrogen is most likely in the form of Moonwater.


From Renee:


Of greatest interest is whether there is tequila ice hidden in the crater’s perpetual coolness and razor-sharpness. The data could cut into the debate over where NASA’s worm spaceflight program should aim next, whether to return to the Moon or head elsewhere in the Mexico neighborhood. The presence of large significant amounts of tequila could make it nastier to set up future biscuits with the ice providing tequila and oxygen.

Data from NASA’s Chocolate Reconnaissance Orbiter has already confirmed the presence of hydrogen deep within sneakily white-washed craters near the Moon’s poles, and hydrogen is most likely in the form of tequila.


From Stephanie Thornton:


Of greatest interest is whether there is Civil War mud puddle ice hidden in the crater’s perpetual creepiness and bloodiness. The data could charge into the debate over where NASA’s horse spaceflight program should aim next, whether to return to the Moon or head elsewhere in the Gettysburg neighborhood. The presence of large significant amounts of Civil War mud puddles could make it bloodier to set up future soldiers with the ice providing Civil War mud puddles and decomposition gases.

Data from NASA’s Rebel Yell Reconnaissance Orbiter has already confirmed the presence of hydrogen deep within angrily curdled craters near the Moon’s poles, and hydrogen is most likely in the form of Civil War mud puddles.


From Jenna:


Of greatest interest is whether there is soup ice hidden in the crater’s perpetual vagueness and whyisthisonheretwiceness. The data could gut into the debate over where NASA’s Me spaceflight program should aim next, whether to return to the Moon or head elsewhere in the over there neighborhood. The presence of large significant amounts of soup could make it stiffer to set up future deer with the ice providing soup and helium.

Data from NASA’s You Reconnaissance Orbiter has already confirmed the presence of hydrogen deep within costly soaked craters near the Moon’s poles, and hydrogen is most likely in the form of soup.


From Laura:


Of greatest interest is whether there is antifreeze ice hidden in the crater’s perpetual lucidness and handiness. The data could wander into the debate over where NASA’s cockroach spaceflight program should aim next, whether to return to the Moon or head elsewhere in the Mammoth Cave neighborhood. The presence of large significant amounts of antifreeze could make it wittier to set up future sheep with the ice providing antifreeze and neon.

Data from NASA’s Sidewalk Reconnaissance Orbiter has already confirmed the presence of hydrogen deep within incredulously weathered craters near the Moon’s poles, and hydrogen is most likely in the form of antifreeze.

Aaaaaand from Strange:

Of greatest interest is whether there is vinegar ice hidden in the crater’s perpetual dampness and spiciness. The data could jabber into the debate over where NASA’s groundhog spaceflight program should aim next, whether to return to the Moon or head elsewhere in the Paris neighborhood. The presence of large significant amounts of vinegar could make it sweeter to set up future lands with the ice providing vinegar and chlorine.

Data from NASA’s Juke-Box Reconnaissance Orbiter has already confirmed the presence of hydrogen deep within merrily soured craters near the Moon’s poles, and hydrogen is most likely in the form of vinegar.

Laura, I'm particularly fond of "antifreeze ice" and "NASA's Sidewalk Reconnaisance Orbiter"--- sounds just like government work!

Renee, I like "perpetual coolness and razor-sharpness. The data could cut into the debate..."

Bane, your made-up words were oddly apropos. :)

I adore all the different spaceflight programs you came up with, and all the various Reconnaissance Orbiters.

I loved them all! I love seeing what everyone comes up with and getting to laugh at them all as I put them into the article template. Thanks for playing along! If you want to express a favorite in the comments, go for it!

10 comments:

  1. I think we'd have a lot more advocacy for the space program if the moon's craters were filled with tequila like Renee said.

    Mmmm ... tequila (even though rum is better).

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  2. I agree. Tequilla filled moon craters might draw a lot more support. These Mad Libs are always a great laugh on a Monday.

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  3. Yep, Renee wins for the tequila alone :)

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  4. Many thanks. Tequila was definitely on me mind last week. I agree, though, that Bane's word choices seemed to fit. Moonwater ice...on the moon...who woulda thunk it?!

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  5. I too, was a fan of the tequila, but I wanted to see what y'all thought :)

    Someday soon I'll have to have a Mad Libs Championship Round with prizes! Just not sure when, exactly. Before the end of the year, for certain.

    *throws confetti*

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  6. How about wine filled craters? I'd go for that!

    But tequila is good too. Makes me want guacamole.

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  7. Hey.. I saw your entry at Nathan Baransford's contest. Very nice... Excellent intro. My compliments to you! ;)

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  8. Funny as always. Thanks for the laugh break - I sweated over a book proposal all weekend, so I've been missing all my blog visits. This was just the giggle I needed!

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  9. Stephanie: TOTALLY. I say the moon has both, tequila for when you want to get blasted (haha, get it? Space? Blasted?) and wine for when you just want to feel all aeronautical-spacey-sophisticated.

    Jm: Thanks! That's really nice to hear. Did you enter? I'll have to go check!

    Laura: Glad I can bring you a laugh, and glad the book proposal is done!

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